Tuesday, October 23, 2007

من فه رش (My rug)


6 comments:

-pauli said...

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh
ZORRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR JWANA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
mwah!
pauli

Nick Jesch said...

I've seen a few hundred handmade high quality "oriental" rugs.....Pakistani, Afghani, Iranian, Persian.... and I even own some myself. But NOTHING ever, anywhere, like this one. Absolutely amazing...very unusual design, and the colours...oh my, the colours. Is it made by the locals, or from some other tribal region? Are there more of this style, or was this one a rarity?

thebeloved said...

Well, I don't know if this is high quality or handmade...I didn't buy it. It actually belongs to my house or my organization...it is part of the stuff that someone years ago bought for here and it has been passed down. It is really pretty. And it is big too. I don't know if this is a rarity...all the rugs feel like rarities because I have never seen two that were the same. I will have to take pictures of some others we have in the house and around...

Nick Jesch said...

flip over a flap at the corner, and look at the backing..if the pile (the fibres you see from the front side) are a bit irregular as they tie onto the backing (the woven matrix that provides the "skeleton"), then it is handmade. If all such knottings are exactly alike, then its done on a machine. What is really unusual about this one is its design...not the typical repeating and/or mirroring smaller elements, (what I've seen in Pakistani, Afghani, Azerbaijani, Kazahki) but a more flowing, overall design... I've not seen yet any Kurdish rugs, but if this is typical of them I've been missing something wonderful....I may have a friend of mine who knows rugs well take a look, see what HE thinks. My bet is that he'll like it a lot. Looking forward to seeing some of the others. I can't relate to the dedication and perseverance (not to mention the boredom) required to make such a work of serviceable art. But, when the sheep are in pasture, no telephone, internet, TV, no car to hop into and drive to "town"...what else does one do besides eat, sleep, and talk? Two of which can be done while working on these things.

thebeloved said...

Most of the rugs I have seen that are "traditional" Kurdish are far more geometric than this one. But lots of rugs here are larger flowing patterns. Some (like the one in a friends house that I will have to take a pic of) are like what you said, smaller repeating elements. I can't imagine making a rug. I visited a couple rug shops in Turkey and watched women bent over making rugs by hand that were of silk. wow.

Anonymous said...

Hey, woman. It's funny to see someone get excited over your rug since I've always thought it beautiful but fairly comon. It was bought in 2004, shortly before L left the country in 2005. It was purchased for the "dining room" in the house next to me, but was commandeered for the upstairs room in your section by the former house folks when N and F lived there. When L and I went shopping for rugs, this particular pattern was everywhere and is still widely available. Not rare at all. OTOH, what is available one year/month/day/minute, can become rate the very next year/month, etc. They are machine made, hand-guided, and are truly very,very nice, among the best that are not silk. It cost about $350 but would probably go for more now. L had some set up money and she spent it well. I'm glad you are enjoying it!
So there's the history of your rug!!
Love you!
Mrs. T